Artwork > Natural Geometry

White tail deer skull oil painting combined with a geometric polytope on a wood background.
Stain, Oil and Gel Pen on Cradled Birch
36" x 36 " x 2"
2015
$1000
Ram skull oil painting split with a white geometric polytope pattern on turquoise colored circle on a black stained wood background.
Stain, Oil, Gel Pen and Resin on Cradled Birch
24" x 24" x 2"
2016
$600
Oil painting of a decaying ram skull on a blue geometric polytope on a white background.
Acrylic, Gel Pen, Oil and Resin on Cradled Birch
24" x 24" x 2"
2016
$600
Taurus Polytope (commission)
Stain, Oil, Gel Pen and Resin on Cradled Birch
18" x 18" x 2"
2015
Mouflon Skull on Cyan
Stain, Oil and Gel Pen on Cradled Birch
24" x 24" x 2"
2015
$600
Ram Skull Polytope in Gold
Stain, Oil, Gel Pen and Varnish on Cradled Birch
24" x 24" x 2"
2015
Bull Skull with Vermillion
Stain, Oil and Gel Pen on Cradled Birch
36" x 36" x 2"
2015
$95
Ram Skull on Navy
Stain, Oil and Gel Pen on Cradled Birch
36" x 36 " x 2"
2014
Moose Skull on Cobalt
Stain, Oil and Gel Pen on Cradled Birch
36" x 24" x 2"
2015
$1000
African Kudu on Chartreuse
Stain, Oil and Gel Pen on Cradled Birch
24" x 36" x 2"
2015
$1100
Ram Skull on Evergreen
Varnish, Ink and Oil on Cradled Birch
36" x 36" x 4 1/2"
2015
Ram Skull with Blue
Stain, Oil and Gel Pen on Birch Panel
24" x 24"
2015

The Natural Geometry series explores the intersection of animal skulls and geometric forms, most often polytopes. These seemingly disparate elements allude to two distinct ideas.
The animal skulls represent memento mori, which are physical reminders of our mortality. The patterns that occur in the structure of some animal horns are natural expressions of some of the most beautiful geometry and are related to the ratio phi and the Fibonacci Sequence.
The more precise expressions of pure geometry juxtapose themselves against the more painterly animal skulls and these represent human consciousness and mankind's ability to find patterns in the world, our yearning to understand the physical universe, and our need to catalogue these ideas. These undertakings have created a sort of immortality for mathematicians and humankind in general, leaving behind a legacy of numbers and formulae and abstractions that, though they more precisely express the material world, may one day seem as simple cave paintings of horses to our descendants.